Why I moved to Dubai

Six months ago today, I moved to Dubai (yay, another Dubai-iversary for me! I won’t do this every month, I promise) and to this day I cannot tell you why. I guess the only answer I have is, why not?

At the end of August 2016, I got the text that kick started this whole thing: “Still not ready for a move?”

Still not ready for a move.

I’d mentioned it before, more than once. My desire to live abroad. But it was always …at some point. I guess it had become one of those things I said but never did. Something I’d get round to eventually. Eighteen months after my friend left the UK for Dubai, it took one simple question from a him to remind me that I’d been all talk, no action.

I’d never even been to Dubai. I’d never really had it on my radar, other than a potential place to visit for some winter sun with a free place to crash. Of all the places on my ‘I want to live abroad’ list, Dubai would not have even made the top 10, probably even the top 20. I’m not a Dubai-type (or so my old colleagues said). I struggled in the summer in the UK, I always got heat stroke, I hated air con. Of all the reasons I shouldn’t move to Dubai, the main one that I couldn’t shake on the pros list was, why not?

So, why not? I have no mortgage, no boyfriend, no children, no dependents of any kind. I loved my job, but I was cruising in it. I wasn’t about to get promoted, or even moved sideways, anytime soon. I loved my hobbies, but I’d been running the same races and going to the same classes for a couple of years – plus there’ll always be there if I want to go back. I’d see my family less, which is horrible with a young nephew I’m now watching grow up from afar, but if I’m honest, I didn’t see them more than every couple of months when I lived in London anyway. Plus Skype is a wonderful thing.

When I was at university, we had the opportunity to study in New York for a semester. I might not have got accepted, and I might not have been able to fund it – but I didn’t even put myself forward for it because I couldn’t face the thought of three months apart from my boyfriend at the time. It took me a couple of years to realise how much of a regret that was, but when I did, I vowed that I would never not do something because of anyone else again. (Obviously, I will be there for my family and friends when they need me, but there’s a difference between loyalty and fear.)

The hardest thing was leaving was leaving my friends. I miss them everyday. But I didn’t see them everyday, and it would place an unfair burden on my friendships if I was staying somewhere because of them. Some of the friends I left are my soulmates, I love them deeply. Which is why I know that despite 3,500 miles, we’ll be okay. Different, but okay.

There’s nothing like emigrating to make you appreciate the intense passing of time. The past six months have sped by in a blur. I’m starting to feel less like a confused (and very pale) newcomer and more like someone that actually has a clue what’s going on in this crazy town. Plus I have the beginnings of a tan, finally.

But my absolute favourite thing so far: the only time I have worn socks in half a year is to workout. Normal socks are now literally redundant in my life. If that’s not a reason to move, then I don’t know what is.

1 Comment

  1. September 14, 2017 / 8:34 am

    Agree re socks! Nodded along to all of this – I’ve been here seven months now and it’s just starting to feel like home and has definitely flown by a lot faster than seven months in the UK would have. x

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